February 3rd in Albany—Join Us

On Tuesday, February 3, New Yorkers for Active Transportation (NY4AT) will be teaming up with New York Public Transit Association (NYPTA) for a lobby day in Albany to discuss pedestrian, bicycling and transit infrastructure. Join us!

In light of yesterday’s State of the State address, now is the time to let your Albany legislators know that sustainable transportation options are […]

Come Out to Support Cross Hudson Rail Freight

This Friday, January 23, the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey will be hosting the first of seven public hearings to solicit public feedback on ten alternatives to move freight across the New York Harbor.

The reason for the study is the current system, which is untenable. The lack of existing freight track infrastructure in downstate New York east of the Hudson River means freight must come in on a truck or barge from New Jersey or via trains that are rerouted 140 miles north to Selkirk, NY and then make their way back south toward New York City.

Source: Port Authority DEIS

Source: Port Authority DEIS

CURRENT PROBLEM: SELKIRK DETOUR

More than 90 percent of freight crossing the Hudson River is moved in trucks. As has been noted time and time again, large commercial trucks are a significant contributor to roadway congestion, poor air and water quality, and the deteriorating conditions of regional infrastructure. There is also a significant social cost, as trucks affect roadway and pedestrian safety and quality of life in residential communities.

There are ways to reduce our region’s overreliance on and the impacts of truck freight while improving the overall system of moving goods into and out of our region. Alternatives to the current system are being studied in the recently released Cross Harbor Freight Program NEPA Tier 1 Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Five of the “rail tunnel alternatives” being studied would create a direct connection across the harbor, allowing freight to move directly from New Jersey to Brooklyn and enabling goods to reach Brooklyn, Queens, and Nassau and Suffolk Counties by rail.

SOLUTION: RAIL TUNNEL DIRECT CONNECTION

Left Image Source: Port Authority DEIS | Right Image Source: Source: Cap’n Transit

Left Image Source: Port Authority DEIS | Right Image Source: Source: Cap’n Transit

This would be a significant improvement over the current system. Some of the rail tunnel alternative benefits are:

  • reduced truck emissions, which pollute our air and contribute to increased asthma rates,
  • project construction jobs,
  • port jobs,
  • protection of the current and future flow of goods, including the region’s food and clothing supply,
  • safer roads, especially for pedestrians, and
  • avoidance of costly repairs of roadway damage caused by large trucks (According to one report, road damage caused by a single 18-wheeler is equivalent to that of 9,600 cars).

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New York 2014: Looking Back on the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

vz & cb vAfter a solid finale in 2013 from the Bloomberg/Sadik-Kahn administration, it was unclear how progress on safer streets in New York City would fare. Right out of the gate, Mayor Bill de Blasio dispelled doubts with bold moves for a “Vision Zero,” and the positive culture change on roads appeared to spill over to statewide efforts. Advocates were able to secure more money for pedestrian and bicycling infrastructure across the state, and several new cities were able to add traffic enforcement camera programs to their toolbox. Alas, sadly, there were setbacks as well.

But setbacks aside, overall it was a good year for advocates and their issues. Casinos and fracking were put in their rightful places, a solid plan for transit for the New NY Bridge was released with a $20 million commitment from the governor, and on the horizon, more and more voices are calling for the $5 billion bank windfall to flow towards transportation infrastructure.

Perhaps the biggest loser of 2014 was the public. Over and over, they were shut out of the decision-making process on how their tax dollars are being spent—especially with regard to the Port Authority and the New NY Bridge. The dark clouds of infrastructure funding and spending loom large in 2015, with massive deferred maintenance and unfunded capital programs, leaving everyone nervous about what’s to come.

The Good

Cities Get Bold About Street Safety — The first year of New York City’s Vision Zero program was a bit rocky at times, but overall an enormous achievement for a city where a growing population puts increasing pressure on limited shared space. The City Council passed an unprecedented number of streets safety bills, lowered the speed limit to 25 miles per hour, and implemented a speed camera program. But this energy was not solely limited to the City. The number of statewide red light camera programs grew significantly, and Albany’s program commits all excess revenue to a Traffic Safety Fund for the city. Suffolk County legislators approved dedicated funding for implementing the county’s landmark Complete Streets policy.

Mass transit plan for new Tappan Zee Bridge proposed — After a year of meetings, the Tappan Zee Bridge Mass Transit Task Force proposed seven new bus routes in a new branded, modern, efficient bus system serving Rockland and Westchester Counties. The state wisely applied for (though unfortunately didn’t receive) TIGER funds to implement the Task Force recommendations for transit along the I-287 corridor.

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Happy Holidays from Tri-State!

Even Santa takes public transit! | Photo: LakeCharles.com

2014 has been a huge year for news from the transportation and transit sectors — especially in the tri-state region. We worked hard this year and are proud of our many accomplishments, including:

successfully fighting the diversion of clean water funds to the new Tappan Zee Bridge project; helping to […]

NICE Bus Public Meeting Tomorrow

Tomorrow evening the Nassau County Bus Transit Committee will be holding a public meeting, which will include a presentation by NICE CEO Michael Setzer. Last week, Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano stated that in order to make up for revenue lost after the repeal of the county’s school zone speed camera program, “painful” decisions about […]

There’s Not a Single Reason Why Governors Cuomo and Christie Shouldn’t Sign Port Authority Reform Bills

This afternoon, New York State Assemblymembers Jim Brennan and Amy Paulin along with New Jersey State Senator Robert Gordon and New Jersey State Assemblymember Valerie Vainieri Huttle will join fellow legislators and advocates to urge Governors Cuomo and Christie to sign two bi-state reform bills aiming to overhaul the Port Authority. According to spokesmen from […]

CTfastrak to Hold Informational Open Houses, Starting Tonight

CTfastrak, Connecticut’s new Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system, is rapidly gearing up for its opening day early next spring. The new service will provide a connection between the cities of New Britain and Hartford along an exclusive dedicated busway. In preparation for CTfastrak’s launch, ConnDOT is ramping up its public outreach to help potential […]

Connecticut Gov, Transportation Advocates and State Officials to Talk Jobs Access

Transportation advocates, Governor Dannel P. Malloy and state officials will gather tomorrow, December 3, for the “Getting to Work:  Transportation and Jobs Access for the 21st Century” event, hosted by the Capitol Region Council of Governments,Connecticut Association for Community Transportation, Transit for Connecticut, Connecticut Fund for the Environment, the Connecticut Construction Industries Association, Regional Plan Association, […]

New Jersey Groups Call for Permanent Fix to State Transportation Problems

The Assembly Transportation and Independent Authorities Committee will hold its fourth and final special hearing regarding the state’s Transportation Trust Fund on Thursday morning as part of the 99th Annual New Jersey State League of Municipalities Conference, now underway in Atlantic City.

Navigating the transportation funding debate is complicated. While the public debate has focused primarily on increasing taxes and creating additional revenue streams, this is only part of the discussion. Clear and concise answers to some of the most complex questions regarding bonding, debt, current and future transportation projects are essential to an informed conversation by all stakeholders from the bus rider to the state’s transportation commissioner.

With skepticism and frustration regarding the condition of the state’s transportation assets and systems, a clear explanation of the accounting behind the soon-to-be bankrupt Transportation Trust Fund is required.

For these reasons, Tri-State, along with New Jersey FutureRegional Plan Association (RPA), New Jersey Policy Perspective (NJPP) and the Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) New Jersey State Joint Council today released a list of questions to guide a transparent and informed discussion about transportation funding between state lawmakers and the public:

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This Wednesday: Newark Safe Routes to School Stakeholder Meeting

Approximately 40 percent of households in Newark, NJ do not own a vehicle, contributing to the city’s high rate of students who walk to school. Through the federal Safe Routes to School non-infrastructure grant program, and under the guidance of Meadowlink, local community groups are partnering with select schools in Newark to create safer, more […]