All Aboard the “Hartford Line”

Central Connecticut’s forthcoming commuter rail system, until today known as the New Haven-Hartford-Springfield Rail Program, is being branded as the “Hartford Line” according to a press release from Governor Malloy’s office today.

This is the second time Connecticut officials have rebranded a transportation service in the years prior to launching. In 2012, the State officially renamed [...]

With Investments in Traffic Calming and Street Redesigns, Bridgeport’s Safety Campaign Shows Promise

Enforcement is a key tool in boosting safety, but should be combined with physical street improvements to have a lasting impact. | Photo: Brian A. Pounds/ CTPost.com

Enforcement is crucial for boosting safety, but should be combined with traffic calming to have a lasting impact. | Photo: Brian A. Pounds/ Connecticut Post

Bridgeport will make infrastructure changes, including curb extensions. | Image: NACTO

Bridgeport officials are considering infrastructure changes, such as roundabouts and curb extensions, like the one seen here. | Image: NACTO

Bridgeport Mayor Bill Finch announced this week that the city is launching a comprehensive safe streets initiative. Seven pedestrians have been killed by drivers in Bridgeport since 2010. Bridgeport is the second Connecticut city to announce a street safety campaign in as many months. In September, Stamford Mayor David Martin unveiled the Stamford Street Smart campaign.

At first blush, the two efforts appear to have a lot in common. Mayor Finch — who participated in a walking audit with Tri-State in 2013 — described Bridgeport’s campaign as a “multipronged approach” focused on education, enforcement and investment, while Mayor Martin called Stamford Street Smart a “multi-faceted approach” that focuses on education, enforcement and engineering. Both campaigns began with crackdowns on distracted driving, and both include efforts to curb so-called “jaywalking.”

Both Bridgeport and Stamford also plan to address the physical condition of their streets, but how they’ll go about doing so is where there’s a more distinct difference between the two initiatives.

The engineering component of Stamford Street Smart is somewhat limited. Making sure signs are visible at intersections, re-painting crosswalks and synchronizing traffic signals are certainly good ideas, but not something to brag about. In other cities, these measures would be considered part of regular maintenance.

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Wednesday Winners (& Losers)

Bridgeport, CT Mayor Bill Finch | Photo: bridgeportct.gov

Bridgeport, CT Mayor Bill Finch | Photo: bridgeportct.gov

A weekly roundup of good deeds, missteps, heroic feats and epic failures in the tri-state region and beyond.

WINNERS

Bridgeport, CT Mayor Bill Finch – The mayor unveiled a comprehensive safe streets campaign in the city which include short and long-term infrastructure improvements and increased enforcement.

NYPD 78th Precinct – The Park Slope precinct replaced a parking spot in front of the building’s entrance with a bike corral.

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams – After seven years with Tri-State, our Associate Director Ryan Lynch will now serve as Policy Director to Borough President Adams.

New York City Department of City Planning – After three years with Tri-State, our Staff Analyst Kathi Ko will now serve as a planner for the Queens Department of Planning.

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Save the Dates: Shaping Our Region’s Future

Regional Plan Association is in the process of developing its Fourth Regional Plan, which is a “multiyear initiative to create a blueprint for our region’s growth, sustainability, good governance and economic opportunity for the next 25 years.” As part of this process, RPA has partnered with Partnership for Strong Communities, Siemens and the Connecticut Chapter of [...]

Stadium or No Stadium, Hartford Must Prioritize Connectivity and Walkability in Downtown North

Downtown North's wide streets funnel fast-moving traffic to and from Interstates 84 and 91, and will certainly need to be reconfigured if this area is to be transformed into a walkable, mixed-use neighborhood. | Photo: Joseph Cutrufo/TSTC

Downtown North’s wide streets must be reconfigured if this area is going to be transformed into a walkable, mixed-use neighborhood. | Photo: Joseph Cutrufo/TSTC

Hartford’s Planning and Zoning Commission voted earlier this week to amend the City’s zoning so that a stadium would be a permissible use in the “B-1 zone,” which covers most of downtown. But then, citing concerns that building a stadium in the Downtown North area — as it has been proposed — may be inconsistent with the City’s plan of conservation and development, the Commission voted against giving the project a favorable recommendation to the city council.

Before the vote on whether to amend the City’s zoning, commissioners debated the pros and cons of having a stadium in the Downtown North area. Some expressed concern about foot traffic around the stadium area. Because of their size, stadiums can create “superblock” conditions, which limit permeability and pedestrian circulation. And although they attract a lot of people on game days, they sit mostly empty outside of events.

Trumbull-looking-north

Old-fashioned lighting is a nice touch in this section of Trumbull Street where Downtown transitions to Downtown North, but it doesn’t make up for Trumbull Street’s excessive width or lack of buildings. | Photo: Joseph Cutrufo/TSTC

On the other hand, it’s probably a better idea to stick with putting the ballpark downtown, where fans have multiple transportation options, rather than, as Commissioner David Blatt put it, having a stadium “plopped in the middle of nowhere, surrounded by asphalt.”  After all, by the time the Rock Cats take the field in Hartford, the CTfastrak bus rapid transit system will be up and running; by the time the team’s second season begins, fans will be able to ride commuter rail to Union Station and walk to the game, “no parking required — just like a real city.”

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Connecticut Gubernatorial Candidates Address State’s Transportation Issues

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy and challenger Tom Foley joined a crowd of over 200 in North Haven on Monday to discuss transportation challenges in the Nutmeg State and take questions from the audience.

The forum was hosted by a broad-based coalition of transportation and environmental advocates, including Tri-State Transportation Campaign, Transit for Connecticut, Connecticut Construction Industries Association, Connecticut Fund for the Environment, Regional Plan Association, Connecticut Association for Community Transportation, Connecticut League of Conservation Voters and Capitol Region Council of Governments.

Tri-State live-tweeted the event:

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RSVP Now for a Forum on Transportation with Connecticut’s Candidates for Governor

Republican candidate for governor Tom Foley (left) and Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy (right) will talk about transportation issues this Monday in North Haven. | Photo: Hartford Courant

Seats for this Monday’s Gubernatorial Forum on Transportation are filling up fast. Don’t miss this chance to hear Governor Dannel Malloy and Republican challenger Tom Foley explain their positions [...]

Making Good on Campaign Promise, Mayor Martin Launches Stamford Street Smart Initiative

Stamford Mayor David Martin announced the City's "Street Smart" campaign Tuesday. | Photo: Joseph Cutrufo/TSTC

Stamford Mayor David Martin announced the “Street Smart” initiative Wednesday. | Photo: Joseph Cutrufo/TSTC

Stamford Mayor David Martin announced the creation of a new  public safety and awareness initiative on Wednesday. “Stamford Street Smart” will take a “multifaceted approach” to traffic safety and is being led by the Mayor’s office in collaboration with the Stamford Police Department, Operations Department, Stamford Public Schools and community organizations.

The program’s launch was timed to coincide with the beginning of the school year. Sergeant Andrew Gallagher, who heads the Stamford Police Department’s Traffic Enforcement Unit, reported that his division on Wednesday had stopped dozens of motorists for distracted driving — a key focus of Stamford Street Smart — and even a few for passing school buses.

Stamford suffers from a sort of dual personality: on some blocks, Stamford seems to be a walkable urban center with several new mixed-use developments; on other blocks, Stamford is more like an automobile-dominated edge city with wide, high-speed streets that make getting around on foot or by bicycle a challenge. So it’s good news that the initiative will focus not only on enforcement and education, but on engineering as well. 

Mayor Martin and Director of Operations Ernie Orgera said the City will review all 205 of Stamford’s signalized intersections, and has already begun to install flashing “No Turn On Red” signage. The City will also repaint crosswalks and re-synchronize the City’s traffic signals — something  that hasn’t been done in 20 years.

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A Better Formula for Safer Streets in Connecticut

Armed with federal money, Connecticut is cracking down on dangerous driving by launching two driver safety campaigns this week.

Monday kicked off the first phase of the state’s speeding crackdown: speeding on rural roads, where ConnDOT says “most speeding-related automobile deaths occur.” This campaign comes with a pool of money available to local municipalities for increased enforcement, special [...]

Higher Pedestrian Deaths in Poorer Neighborhoods

A recent study by GoverningPedestrian Deaths in Poorer Neighborhoods, compiled locational data on all fatal pedestrian accidents within United States metro areas between 2008 and 2012. The study found that in counties across the tri-state region with more than half a million residentsapproximately 8.5 pedestrians per 100,000 residents died during the study period. Suffolk County, NY had the highest five-year fatality rate: 12.1 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 residents.

The analysis also looked at pedestrian death rates for income-based census tracts within each county and revealed a significant disparity for fatalities rates between low-income (poverty rate greater than 25 percent) and high-income (poverty rate less than 15 percent) communities. For example, Essex County, NJ had the largest fatality disparity by a ratio of 2.8, which means that within the county, people living in poorer neighborhoods were almost three times more likely to be hit while walking than people in wealthy neighborhoods. The map on the left shows the top five counties with the highest five-year pedestrian death rate, while the map on the right presents the top five counties in the region with the largest disparity in the pedestrian death rate with regard to income.

MAPS

This pattern is not limited to the tri-state region—the study found that poorer neighborhoods recorded disproportionately higher rates of pedestrian deaths across the United States. According to the report, the pedestrian fatality rates within low-income metro area census tracts were approximately twice that of higher-income metro area census tracts. Neighborhoods with more than 25 percent of residents living below the poverty line had a rate of 12.1 pedestrian deaths per 100,000 people from 2008 through 2012, over two times higher than neighborhoods with a poverty rate below the national average of 15 percent and almost double the national average.

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