Successful Traffic Safety Camera Programs Tie Revenue to Traffic Safety Funds

New Jersey’s red light camera pilot program has officially come to a close as cameras went dark at midnight this past Tuesday after a long battle in Trenton. Supporters of the program cited myriad motorist, pedestrian and cyclist safety benefits, while those opposed insisted it was nothing more than a cash cow for municipalities. Nonetheless, efforts are underway […]

Newark’s Bike Safety Efforts

#gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 25%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Newark PO Benito Torres helps students with drill (stopping, hand signaling, entering traffic) Meeta Patel from […]

It’s Not the Size of the School Zone That Matters, but Who It’s Meant to Protect

recent article published by Newsday argues that crash data does not support the location of speed safety cameras installed near schools throughout Nassau County. The “computer analysis” states that cameras have been placed in “dozens of areas with no history of speed-related accidents.” Of the 76 school zones that Newsday analyzed, they found that only 19 had seen any speed-related crashes between 2009 and 2013.

Newsday’s methodology used an extremely narrow definition of “school zone.” The analysis defines a school zone as marked areas of roads near schools where drivers are instructed to slow down, which essentially limits the analysis to a small sample of cherry-picked street segments near schools. This was based on the highly questionable tactic of “basing the length of each zone on a review of photos of traffic signs in the area taken by Google’s Street View Cameras. When such imagery was not available, Newsday created school zones that were the maximum length allowed by law.”

The safety of a school zone monitored by camera technology extends beyond the designated school zone and is an added benefit for the technology. Wherever speed cameras have been installed, researchers have found that automated enforcement prompts drivers to slow down both before and after drivers enter areas monitored by cameras. This phenomenon, known as the distance halo effect, means that drivers are altering their behavior outside camera range as well. This is particularly important because children traveling to and from school are not confined to sidewalks and crossings solely within school zones.

For these reasons, Tri-State’s analysis used a single definition of “school zone” that encompasses a full quarter mile buffer around a school – the maximum allowable area according to state law. This method paints a more realistic picture of the safety conditions along routes that school age children actually take and vehicles travel. Our finding that 40 percent of the pedestrian fatalities occurred within the maximum allowable school zone is determined by state law and is based on a legal definition, not Tri-State’s interpretation, unlike the subjective school zone created for the Newsday analysis. While not everyone killed in these areas were school-aged children as Tri-State notes, it is irrefutable that 14 pedestrians were killed by cars in these zones.

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Wednesday Winners (& Losers)

A weekly roundup of good deeds, missteps, heroic feats and epic failures in the tri-state region and beyond.

New Jersey State Senator Loretta Weinberg | Photo: johnjay.jjay.cuny.edu

New Jersey State Senator Loretta Weinberg | Photo: johnjay.jjay.cuny.edu

WINNERS

New Jersey State Senator Loretta Weinberg — The Senator solidified her role as champion for New Jersey bus riders by calling for equal investment in and improved conditions at the Port Authority Bus Terminal at today’s Port Authority budget hearing. She is also holding a second commuter feedback meeting this Thursday.

Newark Mayor Ras Baraka — The mayor has joined other leaders in calling for the continuation of the state’s red light camera program.

New York State Senator Jeff Klein — The Senator wants to see part of the state’s windfall bank settlement money used to create a new program called Empire Public Works, dedicated to upgrading the state’s infrastructure, rather than seeing the funds go to a one-shot project.

Camden, NJ — The city recently approved six new major development projects, including Subaru’s new corporate headquarters, “leading to the creation, retention or relocation of some 2,000 jobs.”

Village of Mamaroneck, NY  After completing a zoning study and public engagement process partially funded by Tri-State’s Transit-Centered Development Grant Program, the Village has approved a transit-oriented development rezoning that promotes green building codes, green infrastructure, and green roofs in the TOD district.

PATH riders — Weekend service connecting Exchange Place and the World Trade Center is finally set to resume next week.

Mark Fenton — The public health, planning and transportation expert and Tufts University adjunct professor engaged New Haven residents in a walking tour and planning workshop for the Route 34 development corridor.

Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo — The mayor is banning cars in central Paris neighborhoods.

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If Nassau’s Speed Camera Program Is Working, Let It Keep Working

Since Nassau County’s school zone speed camera program went into effect, there has been a 70 percent decline in violations. County Executive Ed Mangano’s spokesman Brian Nevins acknowledged that this decline in violations is indicative of a “dramatic change in driving habits”, saying “This program has increased student safety and potentially saved lives.”

Yet rather than […]

Connecticut Cities Join — and Climb — the Ranks of Bicycle Friendly Communities

Image: simsbury-ct.gov

Simsbury moved up from Bronze to Silver in 2014’s rankings. | Image: simsbury-ct.gov

Two Connecticut cities were named Bicycle Friendly Communities by the League of American Bicyclists this week. Both New Haven and New Britain received Bronze-level designations, joining Farmington, South Windsor and West Hartford.

The Bicycle Friendly Communities program evaluates communities based on how welcoming they are to cycling from the entry level (Bronze) to all-star (Diamond). Bicycle Friendly Communities often have Complete Streets policies, active cyclists groups, bike lanes, relatively low crash rates, and higher than average percentages of people who regularly bike to work.

New Haven‘s selection as a Bicycle Friendly Community is an obvious one: the Elm City has strong local bike advocates, adopted the state’s first local Complete Streets policy, published its own Complete Streets design manual, and has had visionary leadership in its Department of Transportation for the last several years. Former Director of Transportation Jim Travers launched the City’s Street Smarts campaign and oversaw a tenfold increase in marked bike routes, while his successor, Doug Hausladen, is seeking to speed up the implementation of traffic calming projects and separated bicycle facilities.

New Britain launched a bike connectivity study in 2013 and has been working on promoting its bicycle-friendliness in recent months. With CTfastrak — the region’s first true bus rapid transit system — set to open in 2015, local leaders see the benefit of an improved cycling network in becoming a more multi-modal — and less car-oriented — community.

The Town of Simsbury, which became a Bronze-level Bicycle Friendly Community in 2010, was the only Connecticut town that advanced in the rankings this year, becoming the first in the state to receive the League’s Silver designation.

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Vision Zero’s Biggest Achievement to Date Hits the Pavement Today, but There Is More to Do

drive-25-vz-logoToday marks Vision Zero’s greatest achievement to date: New York City’s default speed limit has officially been lowered to 25 mph. This seemingly small adjustment will have a big impact on improving street safety, as people who are struck by vehicles traveling 25 mph are half as likely to die as those struck by vehicles traveling 30 mph. In a city that’s suffered increasing bicycle and pedestrian fatalities — more often than not in seemingly “safe” scenarios — this speed limit reduction is a welcome first step.

But lowering the speed limit isn’t a panacea. In addition to getting the word out about the new speed limit, New York’s elected officials, community leaders and state and city agencies must now do their part to help change how people think about and interact with our streets and its users. Such an enormous paradigm shift won’t be easy, but it can be done.

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Wednesday Winners (& Losers)

NYC Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer announcing the installation of Queens slow zones. | Photo: Twitter @JimmyVanBramer

NYC Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer announcing the installation of Queens slow zones. | Photo: Twitter

A weekly roundup of good deeds, missteps, heroic feats and epic failures in the tri-state region and beyond.

WINNERS

New York City Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer – Sunnyside Gardens, Woodside and Sunnyside will be included in two new slow zones coming to Queens.

Linden, NJ – Linden’s City Council passed a unanimous resolution in support of “the renewal of the red light camera program in the interest of public safety” – a powerful statement in the face of increasingly vocal opposition.

Connecticut – ConnDOT adopted a departmental Complete Streets policy which “enables the alignment of transportation funds to encourage improvements for non-motorized users,” such as the road diet planned for East Hartford and the addition of bike racks to 50 train cars.

Alexion Pharmaceuticals – New Haven, CT’s Gateway Community College has received a $250,000 subsidy from the company to halve bus fares for college students over the next five years.

Retirees – Americans are outliving their ability to drive safely, and nonprofits are stepping in to connect housing choice and transportation options for the aging.

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This Wednesday: Newark Safe Routes to School Stakeholder Meeting

Approximately 40 percent of households in Newark, NJ do not own a vehicle, contributing to the city’s high rate of students who walk to school. Through the federal Safe Routes to School non-infrastructure grant program, and under the guidance of Meadowlink, local community groups are partnering with select schools in Newark to create safer, more […]

Save the Date: Implementing Complete Streets Projects Using New and Existing Funds

Adopting a Complete Streets policy is an excellent first step toward making roads safer and more accessible for users of all ages and abilities, but as we’ve said before: it’s how the policy is implemented that really makes a difference. Several municipalities in the tri-state region have successfully adopted Complete Streets policies, but the implementation of pedestrian and […]