What Route 35 Could Look Like if NJDOT Followed its Own Complete Streets Policy

 

The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) and Governor Christie have maintained, since it was first announced, that the 12.5 mile Route 35 rebuild project in Ocean County would follow NJDOT’s awardwinning Complete Streets policy. Unfortunately, when asked how cyclists would be accommodated into the project, NJDOT has been elusive. While NJDOT recently launched a website dedicated to the project that provides maps and plans and proposed improvements, advocates remain concerned about the lack of Complete Streets designs in the project.

That’s because, according to the site, there are no plans to include dedicated bike lanes anywhere long the 12.5 mile corridor, and some areas currently without sidewalks will remain that way.

Using the new web application Streetmix, Tri-State decided to have a little fun and re-imagine a few of NJDOT’s Route 35 cross-sections into a truly “complete” street.

 

A cross-section of NJDOT's plan for Route 35 Southbound in Toms River, Lavallette and Brick. Note the cyclist riding on the shoulder and the lack of sidewalks. | Image: NJDOT

A cross-section of NJDOT’s plan for Route 35 Southbound in Toms River, Lavallette and Brick. Note the lack of sidewalks and dedicated bicycle facilities. | Image: NJDOT

Route 35 Southbound in Toms River, Lavallette and Brick, reimagined with sidewalks and a buffered bike lane.

Tri-State’s Complete Street design: Route 35 Southbound in Toms River, Lavallette and Brick, reimagined with sidewalks and a buffered bike lane. Vehicle travel lanes were also narrowed slightly.

DDDDD

NJDOT’s proposal for Route 35 in Mantoloking and Bay Head proposes 10-foot travel lanes and “shoulders,” which are eight feet wide at their narrowest points. | Image: NJDOT

Route 35 in Montoloking and Bay Head, reimagined with buffered bike lanes.

Tri-State’s Complete Street design: Route 35 in Mantoloking and Bay Head, with buffered bike lanes.

Now it’s your turn. We invite you to try other ways to redesign Route 35 incorporating Complete Streets on these and other cross-sections put forth by NJDOT. Let us know what you come up with, and remember to only use the existing right-of-way (don’t make streets any wider than they are currently). Share your designs via Twitter @Tri_State or on Tri-State’s Facebook page .

7 Comments on "What Route 35 Could Look Like if NJDOT Followed its Own Complete Streets Policy"

  1. Andrew Graceffa | August 9, 2013 at 4:03 pm |

    I’ve thought about this b/c I’m in Bay Head almost every weekend. Here is why the 9.0-12.5 section design that you present may not work: on-street parking. The road through bay head is usually parked 60-75% on weekends. Very prominent sharrows would probably be the best option as there isn’t room to accommodate a lane with on street parking as the travel lane is relatively tight as it is.

  2. I love your proposals Janna but you got the bike lane on the wrong side in the second diagram. Yes I know its currently VERY fashionable to put the bike lane on the left side of one-way streets but the proponents for that design have yet to provide a shred of empirical evidence that such a layout is actually safer. My years of cycling experience including riding in left side bike lanes have left me convinced that they create more confusion and make drivers feel more comfortable passing cyclists at much less than three feet than lanes that are on the conventional ride side.

    Sorry for the nit pick but I just don’t want you to give NJDOT too many ideas! :)

  3. Correction: “conventional RIGHT side!”

  4. Can’t let this one go, Andy ;-)

    For our reading audience: left side bike lanes on one way streets provide at least two advantages: 1)as the driver is sitting in the left side of the car, they can more easily judge distance between their vehicle and a cyclist traveling on the left side, and 2) cyclists are safer in left side bike lanes because there are fewer parked vehicle passenger doors being opened into their path than if the bike lanes were on the right side, where driver side doors are being opened into their path.

    Your turn, big guy ;-)

  5. Chris Sturm | August 15, 2013 at 2:40 pm |

    I’ll leave it to the experts to figure out exactly where and how to create the bike lane… But, as someone who has biked on Route 35, I can say YES, a complete street design would make bikers feel much safer!

  6. In Seaside Park Bayview Ave runs parallel to Rt35 and is great for bicycles, and safer also. Was that in the plans?

  7. Ana Isabel de Sá | May 6, 2015 at 6:06 pm |

    my name is Ana isabel, I’m an architect and a researcher at grupo Indisciplinar, from Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

    I’m writing my masters dissertation on open source urbanism and digital tools for civic participation and collaborative design and space production. One of the tools I approach on my work is StreetMix.

    I can see you used the platform for the simulations displayed here, and also that you made a call for the readers to send their own proposals. It would be great to learn more about the experience with the software, to know if you have data concerning the replies you got with readers’ proposals and to know whether you had further experiences with the tool in different contexts. Any information you could have concerning this proccess would be very useful for my research.

    Thank you very much,

    Best regards,

    Ana

    isabelanastasia@gmail.com

21 Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. Today’s Headlines | Streetsblog Capitol Hill
  2. Smart Growth News – August 12, 2013 | Smart Growth America
  3. Meet Streetmix, the Website Where You Can Design Your Own Street | Streetsblog New York City
  4. Meet Streetmix, Where You Can Design Your Own Street in Penang | Sustainable Penang : Toward a New Mobility Agenda
  5. Action Alert: Demand NJDOT Make Route 35 a Real Complete Street | Mobilizing the Region
  6. Meet Streetmix, the Website Where You Can Design Your Own Street | Website Design Guide
  7. New app lets you hack the streets | Grist
  8. Il mix delle vie urbane | Nuova Mobilità
  9. NJDOT Knows How to Implement Complete Streets — So Why Not on Route 35? | Mobilizing the Region
  10. What Complete Streets Implementation Looks Like | Mobilizing the Region
  11. We’d Be More Thankful If… | Mobilizing the Region
  12. What We’re Thankful For in 2013 | Mobilizing the Region
  13. New Jersey 2013: Looking Back on the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly | Mobilizing the Region
  14. Mobilizing the Region’s 10 Most Popular Stories in 2013 | Mobilizing the Region
  15. Latest Design Tool Gives Users the “Key to the Street” | Mobilizing the Region
  16. New Jersey Remains a Complete Streets Leader, while New York and Connecticut Slowly Make Progress | Mobilizing the Region
  17. Meet Streetmix, Where You Can Design Your Own Street (in Penang) | World Streets: The Politics of Transport in Cities
  18. Advocates Applaud Updates to NJ Route 35 Reconstruction Plan | Mobilizing the Region
  19. New Jersey 2014: Looking Back on the Good, the Bad and the Ugly | Mobilizing the Region
  20. It’s Bike Month! Celebrate With New Jersey DOT’s Newest Bicycle Tour Guides | Mobilizing the Region
  21. Route 35 on the Jersey Shore Is Getting Better for Bikes, but There Is More Work to Be Done | Mobilizing the Region

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*