New Jersey’s Most Populous City Adopts Complete Streets Policy

A bike lane in Newark | Photo: Newark Department of Engineering

[An eagle-eyed reader has pointed out that Vineland is technically the largest city in New Jersey; Newark is actually the most populous. Thanks for the spot!]

Yesterday, Newark announced that it had adopted a complete streets policy, making the roads of New Jersey’s most populous city safer for all users. The policy adoption is a major landmark in the state’s long march towards a more multimodal transportation network.

“We have taken a holistic approach to making our streets and sidewalks safe and accessible for all of our residents and visitors, whether they walk, drive, or bicycle. Newark’s streets will be the safest and most welcoming in the entire nation,” said Newark Mayor Cory Booker in a release.

Among other things, the policy calls for:

  • “Safe and accessible accommodations for existing and future pedestrian, bicycle, and transit facilities”;
  • A checklist of complete streets features; and
  • Road design that “[addresses] the need for bicyclists and pedestrians to cross corridors, as well as travel along them, in a safe, accessible and convenient manner.”

While Newark is the most populous New Jersey city to pass a complete streets policy, it is by no means the first. In part due to the New Jersey Department of Transportation’s extensive outreach and website, municipalities across the state have adopted complete streets at a rapid pace in recent years. NJDOT itself also has had an internal complete streets policy since 2009.

As elsewhere where complete streets policies are passed, the measure of Newark’s will be in the success of its implementation. Good thing the city recently got some practice with bike lanes.

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