Can Justice Be Had? Symposium Will Examine the Prosecution of Vehicular Homicide in New York

Fatal traffic crashes rarely result in criminal charges in New York.

Fatal traffic crashes rarely result in criminal charges in New York.

[Update: Cy Vance, the Democratic nominee for Manhattan District Attorney, will give a short introduction to the event.]

The past months have provided many high-profile examples of tragic traffic fatalities involving pedestrians, cyclists and other “vulnerable parties.”  Too often these “accidents” have been the result of careless or even negligent driving.  The responsible drivers are rarely prosecuted due to multiple factors, including the structure of the governing laws.  What roadblocks exist in pursuing prosecution and conviction and what are some strategies for improving the system to find justice for victims’ families and improved measures of deterrence?

Tri-State, Transportation Alternatives, and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law are holding a symposium addressing the prosecution of vehicular homicide in New York State.  Prosecutors, defense attorneys, and legal advocates will examine the existing legal framework and discuss innovative or untried techniques and those in use in other states. The program is free and open to everyone. Attorneys will be eligible for CLE credit — see below.

The symposium is at the Cardozo School of Law (55 Fifth Ave., New York) on October 27, 9 am until 12 pm. RSVP to crimsymposium@gmail.com. If you have any questions call Kyle Wiswall at (212) 268-7474 or Peter Goldwasser at (646) 873-6020.  We hope to see you there!

Schedule/Event Logistics

Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law Moot Court Room, 55 Fifth Avenue (at 12th Street)

  • 9 – 10am: Criminally Negligent Homicide in New York
  • 10 – 10:15am: Break
  • 10:15am – noon:  Lessons from other States / Comparison and Application

Participants

CLE Credits

This course or program has been approved in accordance with the requirements of the New York State Continuing Legal Education Board for a maximum of 3 credit hours, of which 3 credit hours can be applied toward the skills requirement.  This course is appropriate for both newly admitted and experienced attorneys.

Image: New York Times.

Bookmark and Share

4 comments to Can Justice Be Had? Symposium Will Examine the Prosecution of Vehicular Homicide in New York

Leave a Reply

 

 

 

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>